United States dollar conversion

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United States dollar

Abbreviation/Symbol:

  • Piastre
  • Peso
  • Hamiltons
  • Grants
  • Lincolns
  • Washingtons
  • Jeffersons
  • Jacksons
  • Benjamins
  • Simoleons
  • Bones
  • Clams
  • Skrilla
  • Bread
  • Smaker
  • Doubloon
  • Smackeroo
  • Ducat
  • Bean
  • Dough
  • Greenback
  • Bill
  • Buck

Worldwide use:

  • United States of America
  • East Timor
  • Ecuador
  • El Salvador
  • Panama
  • Puerto Rico
  • Northern Mariana Islands
  • U.S. Virgin Islands
  • American Samoa
  • Guam
  • Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (1947–1994)
  • United States Minor Outlying Islands
  • Marshall Islands
  • Federated States of Micronesia
  • Palau
  • Caribbean Netherlands (Netherlands)
  • British Virgin Islands (UK)
  • Turks and Caicos Islands (UK)
  • Bermuda

Description:

The US Dollar is the official currency for the United States of America and is one of the world's most powerful currencies. Ranked as the number one traded currency in the world, it is the largest reserve currency. Multiple countries use the US Dollar as their primary or secondary currency. The Dollar is made up of 100 Cents and coins come in denominations of 1¢, 5¢, 10¢, 25¢, 50¢ and $1. Bank notes are available in $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100.

US Dollar banknotes are made from cotton and known as 'Greenbacks' because of their green and black coloring.

Origin:

The Dollar was first declared the official currency of the United States on 6 July, 1785 but the United States Mint wasn’t established until 1792. The Coinage Act stated that coins would be made of gold, silver and copper in denominations of $10, $5 and $2.5 and that all coins must show the word “Liberty” and resemble such sentiment and the year of issue on one side and that on the reverse, all coins should show an eagle with the words “United States of America.” In 1863 the first $1 banknote was issued as legal tender.

Component units:

  • Dime (10)
  • Cent (100)
  • Mil (1000)

Date introduced:

  • 1785

Central bank:

  • Federal Reserve System

Printer:

  • Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Mint:

  • United States Mint